Greenhouse Gardening

Greenhouse Plants

A greenhouse is a structure that creates a protected environment for plants to grow in, thereby extending the life of the plants. Greenhouse gardening is a fun and beneficial way to garden all year around. Just imagine the possibilities. You can grow and pick your own tomatoes in the winter!

Grow fresh herbs and other vegetables for your family's meals. Start tender plants from seedlings and cuttings to be transplanted later. You can also carry over a variety of flowers and plants to be used again the following season. Indoor gardening increasing the possibilities of a greater variety and continuous supply of plants, flowers, herbs and vegetables. It also gives you the opportunity to cultivate and experiment with various plants as a hobby and develop new varieties of plants.

Your region's climate as well as the types of plants that grow successfully in your area will play an important role in choosing suitable plants for a commercial or hobby greenhouse. Do some research before purchasing to insure success.

Ornamental Seedlings

Ageratum
Dahlia
Lobelia
Salvia
Alyssum
Dianthus
Marigold
Snapdragon
Aster
Foxglove
Nicotiana
Stock
Begonia
Geranium
Pansy
Zinnia
Celosia
Globe Amaranth
Petunia
 
Cleome
Impatiens
Portulaca
 
Coleus
Kale, Flowering
Salpiglossis
 

Greenhouse Vegetables

Beans, Bush
Brussel Sprouts
Collards
Lettuce
Peppers
Swiss Chard
Beans, Fava
Cabbage
Cucumber
Okra
Radish
Tomatoes
Beans, Lima
Cantaloupe
Eggplant
Onions, Bulb
Spinach
Turnips
Beans, Pole
Carrots
Garlic
Onions, Green
Spinach, NZ
Watermelon
Beets
Cauliflower
Kale
Parsley
Squash, Summer
 
Broccoli
Celery
Kohlrabi
Peas
Squash, Winter
 

Greenhouse Center

Planting Schedule

Scheduling is one of the most important items to take into consideration when growing plants, flowers, vegetables and herbs as well as starting seedlings for transplanting outside. It is possible to start a plant too early or even too late in your greenhouse nursery. Many people tend to start too early in their eagerness for spring to arrive. If a plant is started too early, it suffers more from transplant shock when set outside and may also be root-bound and stunted. If a plant is started too late in spring, your transplant may not have developed enough roots to handle the stress of transplanting and may be late in producing food or flowers outside.

When scheduling your plants for indoor gardening, don’t worry if ornamental transplants do not bloom in the pots before transplanting outside, unless you are planning to sell them. Vegetables, however, should not bloom before transplanting. This interferes with their natural timetable and reduces the total yield. If they do bloom while still in the seedling stage before transplanting move them to a bigger pot and start your vegetable seedlings later next year to prevent this from happening again.

Planting For A Continuous Harvest

Market gardeners, or resellers, try to schedule their planting so they can offer their customers a continuous supply of fresh flowers, herbs, and vegetables throughout the growing season. The best approach to planning for a continuous harvest is to keep good production records from previous growing seasons, and to compare notes with local farmers. Weather is a major variable, and growers need to pay attention to cool-season and warm-season effects on seedling establishment and crop growth within the greenhouse nursery.

Many vegetable crops are grown in successive plantings to prolong the harvest season. In addition to sequential plantings, market gardeners plant varieties that require different lengths of time to reach maturity. One common method of scheduling crops is to plan around the average annual frost-free date in the Spring, and the average annual first-freeze date in the Fall. Planting in accordance with optimum soil temperature is another common way. The following table provides a quick summary of this method.

Soil Temperature Germination Ranges for Select Vegetables

Temperature Vegetable Plant
45-85
cabbage, kale, broccoli, collards (germinate well at 85, seedlings prefer 45-65)
35-80
lettuce and most salad greens (at more than 80, germination rate drops 50%)
35-75
spinach (optimum 68)
50-85
onions (optimum 75)
45-95
radishes (optimum 85)
50-85
beets, Swiss chard (optimum 85)
60-85
beans, snap & dry (optimum 80)
70-85
beans, lima (optimum 85)
40-75
peas (optimum 75)
60-95
corn (optimum 95)
65-82
tomatoes (optimum 80)
60-95
peppers (optimum 85)
65-100
cucumbers, melons, squash (optimum 80-95)
 
Courtesy Of: Market News - March 1995


Greenhouse Gardening
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One of the great things about greenhouse gardening is that it expands the range of plants you can grow successfully, no matter whether you are a hobby gardener or a professional market grower. Just about anything that you can grow in an outdoor garden can be grown successfully in a greenhouse. Start with a few plants and add more as you gain more experience and get comfortable with indoor gardening . Most of all, have fun with your greenhouse garden.





At Greenhouse Center, our goal is to provide useful information on choosing between the many different types of greenhouses available, buying a greenhouse kit, purchasing plants for your greenhouse nursery and how to maintain your greenhouse for indoor gardening year-round. Visit our Products page to see a sample of the large variety of greenhouse styles that are available.

The Greenhouse Garden | Types of Greenhouses | Greenhouse Specifics | Greenhouse Plants
Buying A Greenhouse Kit | Greenhouse Care & Maintenance | Products